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The Arts
By its original and broadest definition, "art" is the product or process of the effective application of a body of knowledge, most often using a set of skills; this meaning is preserved in such phrases as "liberal arts" and "martial arts". However, in the modern use of the word, which rose to prominence after 1750, “art” is commonly understood to be skill used to produce an aesthetic result. Britannica Online defines it as "the use of skill and imagination in the creation of aesthetic objects, environments, or experiences that can be shared with others". By any of these definitions of the word, artistic works have existed for almost as long as humankind, from early pre-historic art to contemporary art. - from Wikipedia
Sites in This Category: 17

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Artcyclopedia
"The guide to great art online"

"Our mission is to become the definitive and most effective guide to museum-quality fine art on the Internet:

* definitive - We have compiled a comprehensive index of every artist represented at hundreds of museum sites, image archives, and other online resources. We have started out by covering the biggest and best sites around, and have links for most well-known artists to keep you surfing for hours. Update January/2006: We have now indexed over 2100 art sites, and offer over 75,000 links to an estimated 180,000 artworks by 8200 renowned artists.

* most effective - The Artcyclopedia's custom search engine is already the fastest way to search the Net for information about fine artists. Period.

* museum-quality - There are scads of artists with home pages on the Web, many of whom are extremely talented. But we can't list every site, and we really don't want to set ourselves up as arbiters of who produces "quality" art and who doesn't - making such a judgment is impossible over the Internet in any case. We feel that fairest approach is to rely on the worldwide network of museum professionals to make that call. So our general policy is, if an artist is in an arts museum collection, then he or she is qualified to be listed in our database. See our Information for Artists page for more specific information. "
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Date: 30-07-2006


Added: 04-07-2006 - Updated: 05-07-2006
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Arts & Letters Daily
Compiled by New Zealand resident Denis Dutton, A&LD is a daily digest of intelligent magazine and newspaper articles from around the world

It covers philosophy, aesthetics, literature, ideas, criticism, culture, history, music, art, trends, breakthroughs, disputes and gossip, mainly but not exclusively in the academic world. It's brilliant!
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Date: 29-07-2006


Added: 22-06-2006 - Updated: 05-07-2006
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Christie's
The official website of Christie's, the international auction house

This website can be enormously valuable to you, if you learn how to use it properly. Imagine that you have something very obscure, and possibly very valuable, to sell. Christie's experts will appraise the item for you on the basis of some photographs, if you approach them sensibly (ie the item must be for sale, and there has to be a reasonable prospect that you will use them to sell it for you, if they think that would be worthwhile).

Here's the background to the company, from the website:

Exemplary client service and extensive experience are the two most important assets that have fueled Christie's success as an auction house. This commitment to excellence began in the auction house's early years when James Christie conducted his first sale on 5 December 1766.

Today, Christie’s is the world's leading art auctioneer with global sales in 2006 of £2.51 billion ($4.67 billion). This 36% increase over 2005 marks the highest total in the history of our company and in art auctions. Christie’s offers over 600 sales annually in over 80 categories, including all areas of fine and decorative arts, jewelry, photographs, collectibles, wine, cars and more. Prices range from $200 to over $80 million.

Christie’s has 85 offices in 43 countries and 14 salerooms around the world including in London, New York, Los Angeles, Paris, Geneva, Milan, Amsterdam, Tel Aviv, Dubai and Hong Kong. Most recently, Christie’s has led the market with expanded initiatives in emerging markets such Russia, China, India and the United Arab Emirates, with successful sales and exhibitions in Beijing, Mumbai and Dubai.


Added: 10-02-2007 - Updated: -
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Harold Pinter
Playwright, director, actor, poet and political activist.

Born 10 October 1930 in East London, playwright, director, actor, poet and political activist.

Pinter has written twenty-nine plays including The Birthday Party, The Caretaker, The Homecoming, and Betrayal, twenty-one screenplays including The Servant, The Go-Between and The French Lieutenant's Woman, and directed twenty-seven theatre productions, including James Joyce's Exiles, David Mamet's Oleanna, seven plays by Simon Gray and many of his own plays including his latest, Celebration, paired with his first, The Room at The Almeida Theatre, London in the spring of 2000.

He has been awarded the Shakespeare Prize (Hamburg), the European Prize for Literature (Vienna), the Pirandello Prize (Palermo), the David Cohen British Literature Prize, the Laurence Olivier Award and the Moliere D'Honneur for lifetime achievement. In 1999 he was made a Companion of Literature by the Royal Society of Literature. He has received honorary degrees from fourteen universities.

Pinter's interest in politics is a very public one. Over the years he has spoken out forcefully about the abuse of state power around the world, including, recently, NATO's bombing of Serbia.
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Date: 03-08-2006


Added: 22-07-2006 - Updated: 07-08-2006
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Heather Jansch
The official website of the English artist

Heather Jansch makes extraordinary sculptures in bronze and driftwood.

Check them out!

Added: 13-07-2007 - Updated: 13-07-2007
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Hundertwasser
The official site of Friedrich Hundertwasser, Austrian artist, painter & philosopher


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Date: 29-07-2006


Added: 05-07-2006 - Updated: 25-10-2009
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J M W Turner
The Tate Gallery's amazing 3D site on the great English artist

For the first time, you can now experience what it might have been like to visit Turner's Gallery, by entering our 3D recreation.

Turner altered his house and gallery several times, but we know most about what it looked like in his later life. This 3D recreation is based on research carried out by Dr Selby Whittingham.

The gallery measured about nineteen by fifteen feet, with red walls, a fireplace, and a central skylight. The natural light from above was diffused in a makeshift way, by nets covered with tissue paper and hung across the ceiling. The paintings were shown close together on the walls, though some of them just stood on the floor. Like many artists, Turner was often furious about the way his paintings were displayed at the Royal Academy exhibitions. In his own gallery he could control the way his work was seen and, as Lady Trevelyan explains, for visitors the experience was often a revelation...


Added: 28-01-2007 - Updated: -
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Len Lye
Len Lye, the New Zealand-born artist

"Len Lye (1901-1980), was a New Zealand-born artist known primarily for his experimental films and kinetic sculpture. His films are held in archives such as the New Zealand Film Archive, British Film Institute, Museum of Modern Art in New York City, and the Pacific Film Archive at University of California, Berkeley. Lye's sculptures are found in the collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Albright-Knox Art Gallery and the Berkeley Art Museum. However, the bulk of his work returned to New Zealand after his death, where it is housed at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery in New Plymouth. As a student Lye became convinced that motion could be part of the language of art, leading him to early (and now lost) experiments with kinetic sculpture, as well as a desire to make film. Lye was a maverick, never fitting any of the usual art historical labels. Although he did not become famous in orthodox terms, his work was familiar to many film-makers and kinetic sculptors - he was something of an "artist's artist", and his innovations have had an international influence. He is also remembered for his colourful personality, amazing clothes, and highly unorthodox lecturing style (he taught at New York University for three years)."

Added: 28-01-2007 - Updated: 28-01-2007
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Louvre Museum
The official site of the Louvre Museum, Paris, France

"The Musée du Louvre houses 35,000 works of art drawn from eight departments, displayed in over 60,000 square meters of exhibition space dedicated to the permanent collections. Explore the works on display, taking a thematic or cross-departmental approach. The website offers a selection of 1500 masterpieces from the museum, with expert commentaries. The works are linked to the Atlas database of works on display at the Louvre, and the museum's Prints and Drawings database, providing a powerful consultation and research tool for online visitors."
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Date: 29-07-2006


Added: 26-06-2006 - Updated: 06-07-2006
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Marcel Duchamp
An interesting site about the French artist

Marcel Duchamp (1887–1968) was a French artist (he became an American citizen in 1955) whose work and ideas had considerable influence on the development of post-World War II Western art, and whose advice to modern art collectors helped shape the tastes of the Western art world.

While he is most often associated with the Dada and Surrealism movements, his participation in Surrealism was largely behind the scenes, and after being involved in New York Dada, he barely participated in Paris Dada.

Thousands of books and articles attempt to interpret Duchamp's artwork and philosophy, but in interviews and his writing, Duchamp only added to the mystery. The interpretations interested him as creations of their own, and as reflections of the interpreter.

A playful man, Duchamp prodded thought about artistic processes and art marketing, not so much with words, but with actions such as dubbing a urinal art and naming it Fountain, and by "giving up" art to play chess. He produced relatively few artworks as he quickly moved through the avant-garde rhythms of his time.


Added: 28-01-2007 - Updated: -
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Michael Leunig
A website devote to the life and works of the brilliant Australian cartoonist and poet.

Michael Leunig is known as a cartoonist, philosopher, poet and artist. His commentary on political, cultural and emotional life spans thirty-five years and has often explored the idea of an innocent and sacred personal world. He describes his approach as regressive, messy and vaudevillian - producing work which is both raw and sublime, loved and hated. His themes and images have been widely used and adapted in the realms of music, theatre, therapy, religious life and spirituality .

Leunig was born in East Melbourne in 1945, a slaughterman's son and the second eldest of five children. He was educated at various state schools, kitchen tables, paddocks, rubbish tips, loopholes and abattoirs in Melbourne's industrial Western suburbs. Enid Blyton, Arthur Mee, Salinger, Milligan and The Beatles were early creative influences and his political consciousness intensified radically upon reading his notice of military conscription sent to him from the Australian government in 1965.

He fled from formal education and pursued a successful career as a factory labourer and meatworker where he nurtured his art and philosophy before beginning work as a daily newspaper cartoonist in Melbourne in 1969. The Penguin Leunig, his first book of collected cartoons, was published in 1974 and since then he has produced twenty more collections including books of poetry and prayer. His prints, paintings and drawings have been exhibited broadly and are held in various public and private collections. Leunig's public appearances have included on-stage conversations with people ranging from the Archbishop of Canterbury to an Indonesian President, as well as painting and poetry performances at the Sydney Opera House accompanied by the Australian Chamber Orchestra. The artist provided the images and verse for the Orchestra's 2000 production of the Carnival of the Animals. In 2001 he wrote songs and lyrical poetry with Neil Finn, Brett Dean and Richard Tognetti for the ACO's production of Parables, Lullabies and Secrets and developed a series of short clay figure animations for SBS Television. Leunig's various collaborations and journeys with indigenous painters from remote communities in northern and central Australia have greatly influenced his art, humour and philosophy.

In 1999 he was declared a national living treasure by the National Trust and awarded honorary degrees from La Trobe and Griffith Universities for his unique contribution to Australian culture. His work appears regularly in the Melbourne Age and The Sydney Morning Herald.

He is a father of four and lives on a farm in northeast Victoria with his second wife, Helga, their two children, a vast number of kangaroos, a tiny vineyard, various spiders, scorpions and snakes, a little olive grove and three small dogs.


Added: 13-07-2007 - Updated: 11-02-2009
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NZ-artists
NZ-artists: an independent guide to contemporary New Zealand art

Featuring significant contemporary New Zealand artists, this independent site provides for each a 'gallery' of past and recent artworks, brief biography, price guide and bibliography, and a serious Links page to take you to other informative sites.

It has been developed simply to promote NZ's significant artists and not for the purpose of selling art. Should you be interested in buying work by one of the featured artists, please contact his/her gallery via the link provided.

'nz-artists' has been established by Elizabeth Caughey, New Zealand art collector and co-author of the series entitled 'Contemporary New Zealand Art' (Vols 1-4) published by David Bateman Ltd. Elizabeth has also compiled and edited 'Art Today/New Zealand: 60 exhibiting New Zealand artists'.

Artists are being added to the site regularly, so please do bookmark this page for future visits.

Artists currently (January 2007) reppresented:

Gretchen Albrecht
Chris Booth
Mark Braunias
Tony de Lautour
W D Hammond
Pat Hanly
Jeffrey Harris
Christine Hellyar
Michael Hight
Virginia King
Gerda Leenards
Mary McIntyre
Richard McWhannell
J S Parker
Don Peebles
Peter Siddell
Philip Trusttum
John Walsh
Christine Webster
Susan Wilson




Added: 25-01-2007 - Updated: 25-01-2007
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Sotheby's
The official website of Sotheby's, the international auction house

This website can be enormously valuable to you, if you learn how to use it properly. Imagine that you have something very obscure, and possibly very valuable, to sell. Sotheby's experts will appraise the item for you on the basis of some photographs, if you approach them sensibly (ie the item must be for sale, and there has to be a reasonable prospect that you will use them to sell it for you, if they think that would be worthwhile).

Here's the background to the company, from the website:

On March 11, 1744, Samuel Baker, founder of Sotheby's, held the first-ever sale under his own name. The library of a certain Rt. Hon. Sir John Stanley, Bart. described as "containing several Hundred scarce and valuable books in all branches of Polite Literature" sold for a few hundred pounds. Well over two centuries later, on December 6, 1983, Sotheby's sold a single book, The Gospels of Henry the Lion, for more than 8 million pounds.

Since those early days, it is not just prices that have grown considerably. So too have the scope and scale of Sotheby's itself. Samuel Baker would hardly recognize his old firm, were he to take a stroll down London's present day New Bond Street - or, for that matter, down Manhattan's York Avenue. It has only been in the last century, after all, that the original London company has expanded from book auctions to cover all areas of the fine and decorative arts. This great expansion means that Sotheby's is not just one of the oldest fine art auctioneers in the world, but also now the largest. There are more than 100 Sotheby's offices around the world; and, in 1998, auction sales produced a turnover of just under $2 billion.

Modest though Samuel Baker's first sale might seem today, he was not without connections - or ambitions. Indeed, he and his successors were to handle, with great panache and showmanship, many of the great libraries sold at auction. On Napoleon's death, the books the French Emperor had taken with him into exile on St. Helena were sent to Sotheby's for sale. Additionally, libraries from Prince Talleyrand, John Willkes, Benjamin Heywood Bright, the Marquis of Lansdowne, and the Dukes of Devonshire and Buckingham were all sold through Samuel Baker's auctions.

When Baker died in 1778, his estate was divided between his partner at the time, George Leigh, and his nephew, John Sotheby. For the next 80 years, the Sotheby family dominated the firm and extended its role into such related areas as prints, medals and coins. By the end of the First World War, the firm had so successfully expanded its role in the art market that new premises were required. In 1917, Sotheby's moved from its Wellington Street location to its famous New Bond Street salesroom, which has remained its London base ever since.

Arrival in fashionable New Bond Street also heralded a new era during which the turnover for paintings and other works of art finally began to outstrip books and literary property. This move towards a wider sales arena was a very deliberate one, and the charge was led in the area of Old Master Paintings and Drawings. This diversification effort paved the way for the explosive growth of the firm under the leadership of Peter Wilson.

Wilson, who joined the firm in 1936, took Sotheby's onto the global stage. He ensured the firm's readiness to capitalize on the meteoric rise in popularity of Impressionist and Modern paintings. Perhaps the single most sensational and ultimately influential sale during Wilson's tenure was the famous Goldschmidt sale of 1958.

The Goldschmidt collection comprised seven of the most exquisite Impressionist and Modern paintings ever to come to auction. An evening auction was decided upon - the first at Sotheby's since the 18th century - and those attending were to wear evening dress. Fourteen hundred did attend; including Somerset Maugham, Anthony Quinn, Kirk Douglas, and Lady Churchill as well as hundreds of art dealers from all over the world. The seven pictures were all sold in just 21 minutes. They fetched £781,000, the highest total ever reached at that time at a fine art sale. Cézanne's Garçon au Gilet Rouge was sold to Paul Mellon for £220,000, more than five times the previous record for a painting at auction. It was one of the social highlights of the year, and possibly the most exciting art auction of the century.

Largely thanks to the vision of Peter Wilson, Sotheby's recognized long before its rivals that art was becoming an international market. It was because of this that the company opened an office in New York in 1955; and, more importantly, acquired Parke-Bernet in 1964. Parke-Bernet was the United State's largest fine art auction house, and following its acquisition by Sotheby's, became crucially involved in the rapidly developing North American market for Impressionist and Modern paintings.

Parke-Bernet, and its President Louis Marion, had a distinguished history of selling major collections at record prices. The most dramatic moment for the firm came in 1961, when Marion oversaw the sale of Rembrandt's Aristotle Contemplating the Bust of Homer to The Metropolitan Museum of Art for a record $2,300,000. That record stood for 18 years, until it was broken in a Sotheby's sale by another Marion - his son John, who later became the firm's Chairman.

With the greatest American auction house now a part of Sotheby's, the company looked elsewhere for further opportunities. In 1967, offices opened in Paris, Los Angeles and Houston. In 1968 it was Melbourne, Florence and Toronto. In 1969, Zurich, Munich and Edinburgh joined the list. Expansion continued throughout the 1970s, with offices opening across much of Europe, a provincial network in Britain, offices in Asia as well as numerous new addresses across the United States.

Along with many other businesses at the time, Sotheby's chose this period of rapid growth to "go public." The share issue in 1977 was oversubscribed 26 times, and within 18 months the value of a share had more than doubled.

The early 1980s, a period of market and corporate uncertainty, was followed in 1983 by the acquisition of Sotheby's by businessman A. Alfred Taubman and a small group of investors. Led by Michael Ainslie, Sotheby's once again became a private company.

At the same time, the art market was revitalized by several important sales that set the stage for the series of auctions at Sotheby's which have entered the history books for their drama, their prices and for the way they captured the public's imagination.

One of the most stunning auctions, held on the shores of Lake Geneva in 1987, was the sale of the jewels of the Duchess of Windsor. In an intensely competitive environment, bids via satellite from New York vied with bids from a celebrity audience and from phone buyers around the world. Over $50,000,000 was raised during the course of the sale - more than five times Sotheby's highest expectations.

Anything seemed possible in the late 1980s. In 1989, for example, the firm sold Impressionist and Modern art totaling a staggering $1.1 billion in New York and London. Indeed, by the end of the decade, prices had risen to such levels that auctions attracted global media attention on an unprecedented scale. With these successes in hand, the company went public for the second time in 1988.

As the 1990s began, the all-embracing chill of a global recession made its mark on the art market just as emphatically as it did on so many other markets. With the perspective that 250 years of history provides, though, Sotheby's has learned to manage these art cycles and has seen recovery follow recession a number of times.

In fact, Sotheby's grew considerably in the subsequent decade. Both of the firm's main locations, London and New York, undertook extensive expansions and renovations in the 1990s. In London in 2001, Sotheby's opened premises at Olympia to complement sales at the firm's New Bond Street headquarters, almost doubling Sotheby's gallery space in London. State-of-the-art features and technology provide the most professional and comprehensive level of client service of any UK salesroom.

Sotheby's New York also underwent an exciting expansion project. Completed in the spring of 2000, the firm added six additional floors to the York Avenue headquarters, allowing Sotheby's to consolidate New York office and warehouse space and provide specialist departments with their own exhibition spaces. The finished result is highlighted by a tenth floor gallery that has been called "one of the great dramatic exhibition spaces of New York?an environment to rival almost any of the city's museums."

In 2000, Sotheby's became the first international art auction house to hold auctions on the Internet. Sothebys.com was the venue for some dramatic and unprecedented successes, such as the sale of a first printing of the Declaration of Independence for more than $8 million, 21 panels of the historic Boston Garden floor, and a masterwork by Frederick, Lord Leighton. In addition, Sotheby's opened its traditional salesroom auctions to Internet bidding through the eBay Live Auctions service. Although no longer an auction venue, Sotheby's website remains a vital tool for the dissemination of information and news about the auction house worldwide, and select sales are open for bids via the Internet.

Whether expanding our infrastructure or exploring cyberspace, Sotheby's continues to demonstrate innovation and responsiveness to the needs of our ever-expanding international clientele. As our clients' needs and collecting tastes evolve, Sotheby's flexibility and unwavering focus on expertise and client service will remain our hallmarks into the 21st century.

Added: 10-02-2007 - Updated: 10-02-2007
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Te Papa - the Museum of New Zealand
Te Papa - the Museum of New Zealand

Te Papa has magnificent collections of European art and artefacts, but these are seldom displayed because of curatorial ignorance and prejudice. Te Papa's exhibitions and displays are a reliable guide to what is politically correct in New Zealand at any time, and interesting from that point of view, if no other.

What the Museum says about itself is unintentionally revealing. It is this:

"Te Papa's key tasks are to preserve and present the taonga (treasures) of New Zealand's peoples and to interpret the country's heritage for national and international audiences."
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Date: 30-07-2006


Added: 04-07-2006 - Updated: 05-07-2006
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Van Gogh
The Vincent Van Gogh Gallery

Now here is a lovely site, about the greatest artist of them all.

Welcome to The Vincent van Gogh Gallery. For nearly 11 years now I've worked hard to ensure that this website remains the most thorough and comprehensive Van Gogh resource on the World Wide Web. To the right is a table detailing the contents of the entire site. I'm proud to say that I have the privilege of displaying 100% of Vincent van Gogh's works and letters--a complete, online catalogue raisonné of Van Gogh's oeuvre. As you explore these pages, you'll see the culmination of thousands of hours of work. But that's just the beginning...

On a regular basis I'll be adding more criticism and analysis, historical commentary as well as a vastly expanded web of cross-referential hyperlinks. This will allow the visitor an easy means of exploring the rich tapestry of Vincent van Gogh's life and art. The more work I put into The Vincent van Gogh Gallery, the more I realize that there is still so much left to do. In any event, I do sincerely hope that you enjoy your visit in a journey for insights and information about one of the most brilliant artists the world has ever known.


Added: 28-01-2007 - Updated: -
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