Tell a Friend | Add to Favorites |  Websites: Popular | New | Recommend a Site | About us | Join | Message Boards

Search word or phrase     or try our Advanced Search
Home >> Antiques & Collectables
  Categories
Antiques & Collectables
Architecture
Art Galleries & Museums
Blogs
Books & Literature
Business, Commerce & Trade
Card tricks
Children/kids
Clocks & Watches
Clothing, Shoes & Accessories
Crafts
Economics
Education
Engineering
Environment
Farming
Food & Drink
Games
Gardening
Health
History
Humour
Internet
Jewellery
Law
Magazines
Magic
Mathematics
Movies/cinema/film
Music & Musical Instruments
New Age
New Zealand
News
Philosophy
Photography
Politics
Radio
Reference
Religion
Science & Nature
Shipping and transport
Sport
Television
The Arts
Toys & Hobbies
Travel
War/Military
Weird

  Registered Users
Username

Password

Remember me
Forgot yours?
Register & join
our mailing list now!


  Advertisers
Username

Password

Remember me
Join Now
To Order Preferred Listings



  Select Style





Antiques & Collectables
Antiques are objects which have reached an age which makes them a witness of a previous era in human society. Antiques are usually objects which show some degree of craftsmanship, or a certain attention to design such as a desk or the early automobile. In a consumer society, an antique is above all an object whose atypical construction and age give it a market value superior to similar objects of recent manufacture. Any historical museum makes a considerable use of antiques in order to illustrate historical events and give them a practical context. Collectables (or collectibles) are specifically created for the purpose of collecting. In this respect, they are distinguishable from other subjects of collections, which may also include natural objects (e.g., butterflies) and objects manufactured for purposes other than collecting (e.g., stamps). However, sometimes objects designed for other purposes, such as toys, become so popular among collectors that they are later marketed specifically to that audience. Star Wars action figures are a good example of this phenomenon. The earliest collectables were included as incentives with other products, such as cigarette cards in packs of cigarettes. Popular items developed a secondary market and sometimes became the subject of "collectable crazes". Eventually many collectable items came to be sold separately, instead of being used as marketing tools to increase the appeal of other products.
Sites in This Category: 8

Sort by:   Date added - Popularity - Clicks in - Title - Description


Bad Fads
Fashion, Collectables, Activities, Events - all the bad fads are here!

"While the name of this site is BAD FADS, please note that this is neither an indictment nor an endorsement of any of the fads mentioned. As you know, during the '70s the word 'bad' could alternately mean 'good'! Thus, this site was created to take a fun and nostalgic look at fashions, collectibles, activities and events which are cherished by some and ridiculed by others. Come back soon and remember that these are the fads you wished would stay forever (or never come back)."


Comments
We think this is a useful and interesting site. What do YOU think? Let us have your comments here on the usefulness of the site, and any alternatives which we should be adding to The Unscrambled Web.
Comment by David Harcourt
Date: 29-07-2006


Added: 06-07-2006 - Updated: 06-07-2006
Preview - Visit Website
Report error - Write a comment - Tell a friend - Comments: 1

Christie's
The official website of Christie's, the international auction house

This website can be enormously valuable to you, if you learn how to use it properly. Imagine that you have something very obscure, and possibly very valuable, to sell. Christie's experts will appraise the item for you on the basis of some photographs, if you approach them sensibly (ie the item must be for sale, and there has to be a reasonable prospect that you will use them to sell it for you, if they think that would be worthwhile).

Here's the background to the company, from the website:

Exemplary client service and extensive experience are the two most important assets that have fueled Christie's success as an auction house. This commitment to excellence began in the auction house's early years when James Christie conducted his first sale on 5 December 1766.

Today, Christie’s is the world's leading art auctioneer with global sales in 2006 of £2.51 billion ($4.67 billion). This 36% increase over 2005 marks the highest total in the history of our company and in art auctions. Christie’s offers over 600 sales annually in over 80 categories, including all areas of fine and decorative arts, jewelry, photographs, collectibles, wine, cars and more. Prices range from $200 to over $80 million.

Christie’s has 85 offices in 43 countries and 14 salerooms around the world including in London, New York, Los Angeles, Paris, Geneva, Milan, Amsterdam, Tel Aviv, Dubai and Hong Kong. Most recently, Christie’s has led the market with expanded initiatives in emerging markets such Russia, China, India and the United Arab Emirates, with successful sales and exhibitions in Beijing, Mumbai and Dubai.


Added: 10-02-2007 - Updated: -
Preview - Visit Website
Report error - Write a comment - Tell a friend - Comments: 0

Coins of Great Britain
This site lists all coins minted in Great Britain, with a guide to values

This is a wonderful site, providing detailed information on all coins minted in Britain, including mintages and indicative values. It also includes a detailed guide to grading.
Comments
We think this is a useful and interesting site. What do YOU think? Let us have your comments here on the usefulness of the site, and any alternatives which we should be adding to The Unscrambled Web.
Comment by David Harcourt
Date: 29-07-2006


Added: 21-06-2006 - Updated: 05-07-2006
Preview - Visit Website
Report error - Write a comment - Tell a friend - Comments: 1

Mesoamerican Studies
A site devoted to Mesoamerican studies: the ancient cultures of Belize, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and México.

The term "Mesoamerica" refers to a geographical area occupied by a variety of ancient cultures that shared religious beliefs, art, architecture, and technology that made them unique in the Americas for three thousand years–from about 1500 B.C. to A.D. 1519–the time of European contact. Mesoamerica is one of our planet's six cradles of early civilization. Many aspects of the ancient cultures of Belize, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and México continue to the present and several of these cultural inventions and traits have spread throughout the world.

Comments
We think this is a useful and interesting site. What do YOU think? Let us have your comments here on the usefulness of the site, and any alternatives which we should be adding to The Unscrambled Web.
Comment by David Harcourt
Date: 29-07-2006


Added: 26-06-2006 - Updated: 05-07-2006
Preview - Visit Website
Report error - Write a comment - Tell a friend - Comments: 1

National Museum of Natural History, Washington
The official site of the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History

"The National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) is part of the Smithsonian Institution, the world’s preeminent museum and research complex. The Museum is dedicated to inspiring curiosity, discovery, and learning about the natural world through its unparalleled research, collections, exhibitions, and education outreach programs. Opened in 1910, the green-domed museum on the National Mall was among the first Smithsonian building constructed exclusively to house the national collections and research facilities. Whether looking at the history and cultures of Africa, describing our earliest Mammalian ancestor or primate diversity around the world, examining ancient life forms including the ever popular dinosaurs, or exploring the beauty of rare gemstones such as uniquely colored diamonds, the Museum’s temporary and permanent exhibitions serve to educate, enlighten and entertain millions of visitors each year. The main building on the National Mall contains 1.5 million square feet of space overall and 325,000 square feet of exhibition and public space; altogether the Museum is the size of 18 football fields, and houses over 1000 employees. With a growing network of interactive websites, the Museum is transforming itself into a hub for national and international electronic education, accessible to anyone with access to the internet.
Comments
We think this is a useful and interesting site. What do YOU think? Let us have your comments here on the usefulness of the site, and any alternatives which we should be adding to The Unscrambled Web.
Comment by David Harcourt
Date: 29-07-2006


Added: 04-07-2006 - Updated: 05-07-2006
Preview - Visit Website
Report error - Write a comment - Tell a friend - Comments: 1

Sotheby's
The official website of Sotheby's, the international auction house

This website can be enormously valuable to you, if you learn how to use it properly. Imagine that you have something very obscure, and possibly very valuable, to sell. Sotheby's experts will appraise the item for you on the basis of some photographs, if you approach them sensibly (ie the item must be for sale, and there has to be a reasonable prospect that you will use them to sell it for you, if they think that would be worthwhile).

Here's the background to the company, from the website:

On March 11, 1744, Samuel Baker, founder of Sotheby's, held the first-ever sale under his own name. The library of a certain Rt. Hon. Sir John Stanley, Bart. described as "containing several Hundred scarce and valuable books in all branches of Polite Literature" sold for a few hundred pounds. Well over two centuries later, on December 6, 1983, Sotheby's sold a single book, The Gospels of Henry the Lion, for more than 8 million pounds.

Since those early days, it is not just prices that have grown considerably. So too have the scope and scale of Sotheby's itself. Samuel Baker would hardly recognize his old firm, were he to take a stroll down London's present day New Bond Street - or, for that matter, down Manhattan's York Avenue. It has only been in the last century, after all, that the original London company has expanded from book auctions to cover all areas of the fine and decorative arts. This great expansion means that Sotheby's is not just one of the oldest fine art auctioneers in the world, but also now the largest. There are more than 100 Sotheby's offices around the world; and, in 1998, auction sales produced a turnover of just under $2 billion.

Modest though Samuel Baker's first sale might seem today, he was not without connections - or ambitions. Indeed, he and his successors were to handle, with great panache and showmanship, many of the great libraries sold at auction. On Napoleon's death, the books the French Emperor had taken with him into exile on St. Helena were sent to Sotheby's for sale. Additionally, libraries from Prince Talleyrand, John Willkes, Benjamin Heywood Bright, the Marquis of Lansdowne, and the Dukes of Devonshire and Buckingham were all sold through Samuel Baker's auctions.

When Baker died in 1778, his estate was divided between his partner at the time, George Leigh, and his nephew, John Sotheby. For the next 80 years, the Sotheby family dominated the firm and extended its role into such related areas as prints, medals and coins. By the end of the First World War, the firm had so successfully expanded its role in the art market that new premises were required. In 1917, Sotheby's moved from its Wellington Street location to its famous New Bond Street salesroom, which has remained its London base ever since.

Arrival in fashionable New Bond Street also heralded a new era during which the turnover for paintings and other works of art finally began to outstrip books and literary property. This move towards a wider sales arena was a very deliberate one, and the charge was led in the area of Old Master Paintings and Drawings. This diversification effort paved the way for the explosive growth of the firm under the leadership of Peter Wilson.

Wilson, who joined the firm in 1936, took Sotheby's onto the global stage. He ensured the firm's readiness to capitalize on the meteoric rise in popularity of Impressionist and Modern paintings. Perhaps the single most sensational and ultimately influential sale during Wilson's tenure was the famous Goldschmidt sale of 1958.

The Goldschmidt collection comprised seven of the most exquisite Impressionist and Modern paintings ever to come to auction. An evening auction was decided upon - the first at Sotheby's since the 18th century - and those attending were to wear evening dress. Fourteen hundred did attend; including Somerset Maugham, Anthony Quinn, Kirk Douglas, and Lady Churchill as well as hundreds of art dealers from all over the world. The seven pictures were all sold in just 21 minutes. They fetched £781,000, the highest total ever reached at that time at a fine art sale. Cézanne's Garçon au Gilet Rouge was sold to Paul Mellon for £220,000, more than five times the previous record for a painting at auction. It was one of the social highlights of the year, and possibly the most exciting art auction of the century.

Largely thanks to the vision of Peter Wilson, Sotheby's recognized long before its rivals that art was becoming an international market. It was because of this that the company opened an office in New York in 1955; and, more importantly, acquired Parke-Bernet in 1964. Parke-Bernet was the United State's largest fine art auction house, and following its acquisition by Sotheby's, became crucially involved in the rapidly developing North American market for Impressionist and Modern paintings.

Parke-Bernet, and its President Louis Marion, had a distinguished history of selling major collections at record prices. The most dramatic moment for the firm came in 1961, when Marion oversaw the sale of Rembrandt's Aristotle Contemplating the Bust of Homer to The Metropolitan Museum of Art for a record $2,300,000. That record stood for 18 years, until it was broken in a Sotheby's sale by another Marion - his son John, who later became the firm's Chairman.

With the greatest American auction house now a part of Sotheby's, the company looked elsewhere for further opportunities. In 1967, offices opened in Paris, Los Angeles and Houston. In 1968 it was Melbourne, Florence and Toronto. In 1969, Zurich, Munich and Edinburgh joined the list. Expansion continued throughout the 1970s, with offices opening across much of Europe, a provincial network in Britain, offices in Asia as well as numerous new addresses across the United States.

Along with many other businesses at the time, Sotheby's chose this period of rapid growth to "go public." The share issue in 1977 was oversubscribed 26 times, and within 18 months the value of a share had more than doubled.

The early 1980s, a period of market and corporate uncertainty, was followed in 1983 by the acquisition of Sotheby's by businessman A. Alfred Taubman and a small group of investors. Led by Michael Ainslie, Sotheby's once again became a private company.

At the same time, the art market was revitalized by several important sales that set the stage for the series of auctions at Sotheby's which have entered the history books for their drama, their prices and for the way they captured the public's imagination.

One of the most stunning auctions, held on the shores of Lake Geneva in 1987, was the sale of the jewels of the Duchess of Windsor. In an intensely competitive environment, bids via satellite from New York vied with bids from a celebrity audience and from phone buyers around the world. Over $50,000,000 was raised during the course of the sale - more than five times Sotheby's highest expectations.

Anything seemed possible in the late 1980s. In 1989, for example, the firm sold Impressionist and Modern art totaling a staggering $1.1 billion in New York and London. Indeed, by the end of the decade, prices had risen to such levels that auctions attracted global media attention on an unprecedented scale. With these successes in hand, the company went public for the second time in 1988.

As the 1990s began, the all-embracing chill of a global recession made its mark on the art market just as emphatically as it did on so many other markets. With the perspective that 250 years of history provides, though, Sotheby's has learned to manage these art cycles and has seen recovery follow recession a number of times.

In fact, Sotheby's grew considerably in the subsequent decade. Both of the firm's main locations, London and New York, undertook extensive expansions and renovations in the 1990s. In London in 2001, Sotheby's opened premises at Olympia to complement sales at the firm's New Bond Street headquarters, almost doubling Sotheby's gallery space in London. State-of-the-art features and technology provide the most professional and comprehensive level of client service of any UK salesroom.

Sotheby's New York also underwent an exciting expansion project. Completed in the spring of 2000, the firm added six additional floors to the York Avenue headquarters, allowing Sotheby's to consolidate New York office and warehouse space and provide specialist departments with their own exhibition spaces. The finished result is highlighted by a tenth floor gallery that has been called "one of the great dramatic exhibition spaces of New York?an environment to rival almost any of the city's museums."

In 2000, Sotheby's became the first international art auction house to hold auctions on the Internet. Sothebys.com was the venue for some dramatic and unprecedented successes, such as the sale of a first printing of the Declaration of Independence for more than $8 million, 21 panels of the historic Boston Garden floor, and a masterwork by Frederick, Lord Leighton. In addition, Sotheby's opened its traditional salesroom auctions to Internet bidding through the eBay Live Auctions service. Although no longer an auction venue, Sotheby's website remains a vital tool for the dissemination of information and news about the auction house worldwide, and select sales are open for bids via the Internet.

Whether expanding our infrastructure or exploring cyberspace, Sotheby's continues to demonstrate innovation and responsiveness to the needs of our ever-expanding international clientele. As our clients' needs and collecting tastes evolve, Sotheby's flexibility and unwavering focus on expertise and client service will remain our hallmarks into the 21st century.

Added: 10-02-2007 - Updated: 10-02-2007
Preview - Visit Website
Report error - Write a comment - Tell a friend - Comments: 0

The Top 20 Watches of the 20th Century
This is a TIME article, with photos and text on the Top 20 Watches

The end of a century is a time for looking back, evaluating and reminiscing. Most of all, it seems, it's a time for making lists. By now, we all know the names of the 100 best books, best movies, and biggest news stories of the 20th century. So, in the enumerative spirit of the times, we present here the 20 most important wristwatches of the 20th century.

What do we mean by important? Several things. Some of the watches are on the list because they represent technological breakthroughs. Others because of their innovative design. Others because of their enduring popularity and still others because they were, quite simply, examples of watchmaking virtuosity.

We enlisted a panel of three experts to help us compile the list. They are Osvaldo Patrizzi, founder and head of the Geneva-based auction house Antiquorum, which has been specializing in timepieces since the mid-1970's. Antiquorum is the biggest watch-auction house in the world and Patrizzi one of the world's best-known watch historians.

Charles Cleves, a long-time watch dealer, collector, and authority of vintage wristwatches. His store, Cleves and Lonnemann, is in Bellevue, Ky.

Roland Schild, and expert on Swiss watches and the modern Swiss watch industry. Schild, now retired, spent 30 years as a media consultant to Swiss watch associations and firms. Darwel S.A., the firm he co-founded in 1969, is the Swiss watch industry's top public relations firm.

Each panelist compiled a list of what he regards as the most important wristwatches of the century. So did we. We compared the lists and, after weighing the arguments made on behalf of the contenders - and there was considerable disagreement among our panelists - chose 20 of them. The final decisions were based on suggestions from the panelists but were, ultimately, ours alone.

The watches are presented in alphabetical order except for the last, the Watch of the Century (which all the panelists agreed on, as did everyone else whose opinion we asked).


Added: 07-08-2006 - Updated: -
Preview - Visit Website
Report error - Write a comment - Tell a friend - Comments: 0

TimeZone.com
The world's leading watch information resource

TimeZone is the world's leading English language website offering wristwatch discussion, information, news, and education. TimeZone is an independently owned discussion, information and education web site. We have no retail operations, and we are not affiliated with any retailer or television sales program.

Forums:

Public Forum
This is TimeZone's main watch discussion forum. The discussion is fast paced, so comments and questions usually receive quick responses. People of all knowledge levels participate - from beginners to WIS (Watch Idiot Savants). Discussion topics include virtually everything related to watches and the watch industry.

Basel/SIHH 2006
Visit this forum for all the latest news from the leading wristwatch shows in Basel and Geneva.

Vintage Watches
Welcome to TimeZone's Vintage Watch Forum. This is the place for all enthusiasts of older timepieces to discuss their interests. From pocket watches to the arrival of the battery powered watch, the Vintage Forum covers a diverse and wonderful range of timepieces. Feel free to discuss timepieces produced up to approximately 1980 here.

Japanese Forum
TimeZone's Japanese language forum is a Japanese version of the Public Forum, where Japanese watch enthusiasts and WIS gather and talk about watches and related subjects. This is the forum where East meets West, and participation is not limited to the native Japanese speaking audience. Many people from around the world join in and enjoy the watch-related discussion in this forum. TimeZone is only U.S.-based watch discussion site offering a Japanese language forum.

Fashion & Art Watch Forum
TimeZone originally launched this innovative forum in response to the increasing interest in women's watches. However, it has since become apparent that an appreciation for technology, beauty and aesthetics are not exclusive to either sex. This forum is a place to discuss Fashion and Art watches as important additions to our wardrobes, our lifestyles and our sense of style.

Watchmaking & Repair
This forum is for watchmakers, watchmaking students, and those with an interest in or questions about watchmaking or repairing watches. Moderator Machiel Kalf is a Master Watchmaker and a watchmaking instructor with more than 20 years of experience. He also teaches TimeZone's on-line Watch School. Ed Hahn is an Engineer and a long-time TZ contributor who has a special interest in the technical side of watches. Ed writes a regular feature for TimeZone called, and he drafted TZ's Wristwatch FAQ. This forum welcomes all watchmaking - related discussion, including questions and answers about sources for general categories of parts or services, and "help wanted" ads that relate to the watchmaking or repair trade.

Independent Horology
This forum is dedicated to discussion about independent watch and clock makers. Independents are the leading creative force in horology, generating a vast majority of the significant horological breakthroughs, from the earliest days to current times. Join watchmaker and moderator Ron DeCorte in discussing these true artisans.

Plus forums on brands such as Audemars Piguet, Breguet, Cartier, Heuer/TAG Heuer, Jaeger-LeCoultre, Patek Philippe, Rolex and many others.
Comments
We think this is a useful and interesting site. What do YOU think? Let us have your comments here on the usefulness of the site, and any alternatives which we should be adding to The Unscrambled Web.
Comment by David Harcourt
Date: 23-08-2006


Added: 07-08-2006 - Updated: -
Preview - Visit Website
Report error - Write a comment - Tell a friend - Comments: 1

Sort by:   Date added - Popularity - Clicks in - Title - Description



Most Useful Sites
Movie Database
About.com
Dictionary.com
Currency Converter
Wikipedia
Language Translation


Newest Sites
Embroidery Designs - Photo Stitch Designs, Free Designs, New Patterns Download Every Week
Nature - the international weekly journal of science
Wizard Headquarters - Your Partner In Magic
Landcare Research NZ
Ranker.com - List making made easy
A dogs-life.info, A Blog For Animal Lovers
Greve In Chianti
Cambridge School Classics Project
Friends of Classics
Sloane Crosley
The Australian
The world's weather
The Dictionary of New Zealand Biography
Jamie Oliver
The Daily Show with Jon Stewart
New Zealand Cricket
Greenwich Mean Time
Daniel Madison - Illusionist & Visual Artist
Ellusionist - Magic Beyond Belief
Theory11.com - Card Magic
Dan and Dave - Card Magic
New Zealand Qualifications Authority [NZQA]
Graeme Davidson
The Inspector Alleyn Mysteries
The Long Now Foundation
Rugby: the Tri-Nations
The X-Files
Star Trek
Buffy the Vampire Slayer
The Moomins

Popular Sites
Google Scholar.com
New Zealand post code directory
Write Backwards.com
Charles Dickens's characters
Google News
Fishing Gear: Mike’s Reel Repair Schematics
The Top 20 Watches of the 20th Century
Jennifer's Language Page
Planet Hiltron
enotes
Arts & Letters Daily
Borat!
LA Weekly
Worldwide weather reports
Big Hoaxes.com
ScienceBlogs
London Times
Destiny New Zealand
Arcade Street
New Yorker
Fibermania
Lake Atitlan and Panajachel
The 10,000 year calendar
Australian Women's Weekly
BBC News
South Park
Asterix New Zealand
Ask Philosophers
Australian White pages
Edward Governo: Historian of Things That Never Were



Copyright 2006: theunscrambledweb.com
All logos, trademarks, brandnames and website names are the legal property of the relevant websites. The Unscrambled Web does not list any sites known to contain adult content, viruses or any damaging content, however we do not assume any responsibility for any websites listed. We recommend that all internet users should maintain up to date anti-virus and anti-spyware software on their computers.